Tag Archive for ‘employment’

Reluctant Return of Native-Born Construction Workers Drives the Immigrant Share Up

New NAHB research shows that the share of foreign-born workers in the US construction labor force has been rising since the housing recovery got underway. Immigrant workers now account for close to one in four workers, the highest share recorded by the American Community Survey (ACS). The time-series analysis shows that the rising share of immigrants in construction cannot be… Read More ›

148,000 Jobs Added in December

According to the Employment Situation for December 2017 reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 148,000 in December and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.1% for the third consecutive month. Employment growth has averaged 171,000 per month in 2017, compared with the average monthly growth of 187,000 over all of 2016. The… Read More ›

Construction Job Openings Rise in October

The count of unfilled jobs in the construction sector increased in October. This increase occurred during a period of expansion for repair and remodeling work in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. According to the BLS Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) and NAHB analysis, the number of open construction sector jobs (on a seasonally adjusted basis) increased to 227,000 in October. This count is close… Read More ›

Solid Employment Gains in November

According to the Employment Situation for November 2017 reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 228,000 in November and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.1%. Employment growth has averaged 174,000 per month so far this year, compared with the average monthly growth of 187,000 over all of 2016. The unemployment rate was… Read More ›

Construction Job Openings in September

The count of unfilled jobs in the construction sector declined in September. Given the significant need for repair and restoration work in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, we can expect increases in the months ahead. According to the BLS Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) and NAHB analysis, the number of open construction sector jobs (on a seasonally adjusted basis)… Read More ›

Employment Growth Rebounds in October

According to the Employment Situation for October 2017 reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 261,000 in October and the unemployment rate decreased to 4.1% in October, from 4.2% in September. Employment rebounded sharply in October after hurricane-related disruptions in September. Employment growth reinforced the Fed’s statement on Wednesday that “the labor market… Read More ›

Construction Job Openings Reach New Cycle High

The count of unfilled jobs in the construction sector continued to rise in August, reaching the highest level since February 2007. Given the significant need for repair and restoration work in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, we can expect additional increases in the months ahead. According to the BLS Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) and NAHB analysis, the number… Read More ›

Hurricanes Impact Job Numbers in September

According to the Employment Situation for September 2017, reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), total nonfarm payroll employment decreased by 33,000 in September. According to the BLS, “A sharp employment decline in food services and drinking places and below-trend growth in some other industries likely reflected the impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey.” Employment growth has averaged 148,000… Read More ›

Construction Job Openings Rise During Summer

The count of unfilled jobs in the construction sector continued to rise in July, following an increase in June and a soft month in May. Given the significant need for repair and restoration work in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, we can expect additional increases in the months ahead. NAHB, for example, estimates a need for an additional 10,000 to 20,000 construction… Read More ›