Tag Archive for ‘labor shortage’

Share of Builders Reporting Labor Shortages Rises Again

Labor and subcontractor shortages have become even more widespread in July of 2017 than they were in June of 2016, according to single-family builders responding to special questions on the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI) survey. The July 2017 HMI survey asked builders about shortages in 15 specific occupations that were either recommended by Home Builders Institute (NAHB’s workforce development arm)… Read More ›

Young Adults & the Construction Trades

NAHB conducted a national poll of young adults ages 18 to 25 to find out how this age group feels about a career in the construction trades. The majority of young adults (74%) say they know the field in which they want to have a career.  Of these, only 3% are interested in the construction trades. Most of the young… Read More ›

FOMC Statement: All Eyes on December

The statement released following the September meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) fell in line with market expectations as the committee chose to keep the federal funds rate unchanged.  The Committee’s assessment of the economy remained positive, leaving a December rate hike very much in play.  In the statement, the Committee continued its upbeat assessment of labor and economic activity…. Read More ›

More Builders Report Labor/Subcontractor Shortages

A survey of single-family builders conducted by NAHB in June 2016 shows that shortages of labor and subcontractors have become more widespread than they were a year ago. The survey consisted of special questions on labor and subcontractor availability that NAHB has periodically added to the instrument for the monthly NAHB/Well Fargo Housing Market Index.  The questions have covered 9… Read More ›

Share of Remodelers Reporting Labor Shortages Climbs Even Higher

Eighty percent of remodelers reported a shortage of finished carpenters (and 41 percent said the shortage was serious), according to special questions on NAHB’s Remodeling Market Index (RMI) survey in the 3rd quarter of 2015. That’s 8 percentage points higher than NAHB remodelers were reporting just a year ago. The RMI survey asked remodelers about availability of labor in the 12 categories recommended by Home… Read More ›

For Builders, Labor/Subcontractor Shortage Intensifies

A survey of single-family builders conducted by NAHB in June 2015 shows that shortages of labor and subcontractors—already quite widespread in mid-2014—have become even more widespread during the past year. The shortages are most acute for basic skills like carpentry, which are needed during the construction of any home.  For example, in the 2015 survey 69 percent of builders reported a… Read More ›

Construction Immigrants Highly Concentrated in Some States and Trades

New NAHB research shows that while foreign-born workers represent a substantial component of the US construction labor force, accounting for almost 23 percent, their share is even higher in construction trades, reaching 28 percent. Concentration of immigrants is particularly high in some of the trades needed to build a home, like carpenters, painters, drywall/ceiling tile installers, brick masons, and construction… Read More ›

Even More Remodelers Now Report Labor Shortages

If I were a carpenter… I’d have an easy time finding a remodeling business that wanted to employ me in many parts of the country, according to a recent NAHB survey. The survey is the one used to generate NAHB’s Remodeling Market Index (RMI). The RMI survey for the 3rd quarter of 2014 included a set of special questions asking remodelers about availability of labor… Read More ›

Builders See Shortages of Labor and—Especially—Subcontractors

Data from a June 2014 NAHB survey show that shortages of labor and subcontractors have become substantially more widespread since 2013.   Shortages are particularly acute for workers with basic skills like carpentry, who are needed in significant numbers during the construction of any home. The incidence of reported shortages is also surprisingly high relative to the current state of new home construction, which… Read More ›