Tag Archive for ‘MID’

Tax Policy and Housing

Tax policy plays a key role in shaping housing demand, determining business conditions and deterring or fostering economic growth. Housing-related tax policy is of such significant importance that it has been selected as a primary issue for NAHB’s 2014 legislative conference, “Bringing Housing Home,” which takes place March 17-21 as home builders and other members of the residential construction industry meet federal lawmakers. As… Read More ›

State-Level Mortgage Interest Deduction Statistics

The tax benefits of the mortgage interest deduction (MID)  are primarily targeted to the middle class. According to 2012 Congressional estimates, 65.4% of the tax benefit is collected by households who have economic income* of less than $200,000.  Of course, the claims for the MID are going to vary state-to-state given differences in house prices and other costs of living, household incomes, and tax… Read More ›

How Homeowners’ Tax Rates Could Go Down, but Their Tax Bills Go Up

NAHB has published a new paper analyzing the mortgage interest deduction (MID). The MID has been in the news a lot recently, as the talk heats up of possible tax hikes in 2013 . The new research adds to NAHB’s existing tax policy analysis by providing a means to examine the possible impacts of future comprehensive tax reform proposals. Analysis of “winners” and “losers” of tax reform requires data… Read More ›

Tax Week: The Mortgage Interest Deduction

As tax filing season comes to a close, now is a good time to take a look at some of the basic facts concerning the mortgage interest deduction (MID). As homeowners past and present know, the MID is a cornerstone of American tax and housing policy. Broadly claimed, the deduction facilitates homeownership.  A few facts about the MID from 2010… Read More ›

Who Lives in New Housing?

April is New Homes Month, so we thought we would take a look at the demographic data from the most recent edition of the American Housing Survey (AHS) to see who lives in newly constructed homes. The AHS defines new construction as housing units no more than four years of age. Typically, larger households are relatively more likely to live in new homes…. Read More ›

Where are the Nation’s Second Homes?

Second home ownership is often discussed in housing policy debates, but in general there is a poor understanding of what is considered a second home and where these homes are located. This is particularly true in tax policy contexts because the most common stereotype of a “second” home – an expensive beach house – is often a rental property that is not eligible for the mortgage… Read More ›