Housing Affordability Plunges on Soaring Material Costs, Rising Home Prices

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Soaring building material costs, high demand and low inventory have added tens of thousands of dollars to the price of a new home and caused housing affordability to fall to its lowest level in nearly a decade during the second quarter of 2021.

According to the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)/Wells Fargo Housing Opportunity Index (HOI), 56.6 percent of new and existing homes sold between the beginning of April and end of June were affordable to families earning the U.S. median income of $79,900. This is down sharply from the 63.1 percent of homes sold in the first quarter of 2021 and the lowest affordability level since the beginning of the revised series in the first quarter of 2012.

The HOI shows that the national median home price surged to a record $350,000 in the second quarter, up $30,000 from the first quarter. This is the largest quarterly price hike in the history of this series. Meanwhile, average mortgage rates increased by 13 basis points in the second quarter to 3.09 percent from the rate of 2.96 percent in the first quarter.

Pittsburgh, Pa. was the nation’s most affordable major housing market, defined as a metro with a population of at least 500,000. In Pittsburgh, 90.6 percent of all new and existing homes sold in the second quarter were affordable to families earning the area’s median income of $84,800.

Meanwhile, Cumberland-Md.-W.Va., was rated the nation’s most affordable smaller market, with 94.0 percent of homes sold in the second quarter being affordable to families earning the median income of $60,800.

For the third straight quarter, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Calif., remained the nation’s least affordable major housing market. There, just 8.4 percent of the homes sold during the second quarter were affordable to families earning the area’s median income of $78,700.

Four of the five least affordable small housing markets were also in the Golden State. However, at the very bottom of the affordability chart was Corvallis, Ore., where 7.2 percent of all new and existing homes sold in the second quarter were affordable to families earning the area’s median income of $93,000.

Visit nahb.org/hoi for tables, historic data and details.

 



Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: