Tag Archive for ‘energy efficiency’

Energy Tax Credits: Large Impacts After 2010 Rule Changes

In 2005, Congress established a number of energy-efficiency tax incentives related to housing. These policies include the tax code section 45L credit for the construction of energy-efficient homes, the 25C credit for retrofitting existing homes, and the 25D credit for the installation of power production property in new and existing homes. Using earlier IRS data for tax year 2009, we… Read More ›

Senate Finance Staff Discussion Draft: Energy Tax Incentives

Last week saw the release of yet another discussion draft from the staff of the Senate Finance Committee concerning tax reform. Following draft proposals concerning depreciation/accounting and other business expenses (such as advertising), the most recent draft proposes changes to the tax code’s rules concerning energy production and energy-efficient improvements. Under the draft proposal, most existing energy tax incentives would be… Read More ›

Average Monthly Electric Bill by State

*** Please note this post was updated in March 2015 using 2013 data. That update can be found here. The average monthly electric bill for residential properties in Hawaii was $203.15, the highest in the nation for 2012, according to recently released data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The average residential electric bill, by contrast, in New Mexico… Read More ›

Rise of Solar Powered Homes

The count of homes powered by photovoltaic (PV) systems is rising. And while solar-powered homes remain a small share of the total housing stock, that share is growing through a combination of policy incentives and homebuyer preferences. Among the top features homebuyers are seeking in a home is energy-efficiency. In fact, in a 2012 NAHB study of homebuyer preferences, energy-efficiency elements… Read More ›

Energy Efficiency Should Yield 10 Percent-Plus Return, Study Says

A study published in June  presents evidence in support of NAHB’s policy, which classifies a change in building codes as cost effective if it returns at least 10 percent in energy savings the first year. The study argues that a common alternative to NAHB’s policy, using the current mortgage rate to evaluate energy efficiency, is an unrealistic assumption and produces unrealistic results…. Read More ›