The Rental Housing Stock

Given the increasing focus with respect to growing demand for rental properties, we thought we would present the breakdown of the rental housing stock by structure type. Using the 2009 American Housing Survey, the data show that 30% of all housing units in the United States are renter-occupied or vacant for-rent.  

A surprisingly large share of this rental housing stock consists of single-family detached homes: 27%.

When adding townhouses (single-family attached units), the share of the rental housing stock due to single-family homes is roughly one-third (34% once rounded). A large share is also due to homes that have been divided into two to four apartments with some common space, representing 20% of the rental housing stock.

Subtracting out manufactured housing units, this leaves only 44% of rental housing due to traditional multifamily apartment buildings of five or more units.

Looking within the structure categories, the traditional expectations emerge. Only 14% of single-family homes are rental units. But more than 80% of housing units in 2+ unit buildings are in the rental housing stock.

These percentages are useful to keep in mind when examining discussions of rental housing: it is not entirely a multifamily building narrative. And this analysis is based on 2009 AHS data. In the intervening period, the share of rental housing stock has grown, particularly for those types of housing that have been traditionally owner-occupied.

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18 Responses to The Rental Housing Stock

  1. [...] a quarter are single-family homes. Here's the NAHB "Eye On Housing" report ("The Rental Housing Stock"). But these numbers barely graze the surface. We don't know what these units are like, or [...]

  2. [...] was eye-opening when the National Association of Home Builders recently reported that 53% of U.S. for-rent housing is comprised of single-family detached homes (27%), duplexes [...]

  3. Thanks for the post regarding The Rental Housing Stock . It was very helpful..keep posting more.

  4. [...] The 2009 American Housing Survey indicates that 30 percent of all housing units in the United States are renter-occupied or vacant for-rent, and a startlingly large share of total rental housing stock consists of single-family detached homes: 27 percent, according to the National Association of Home Builders’ blog. [...]

  5. Laura Gray says:

    Thank you for sharing this. Keep posting more.

  6. [...] July we examined the composition of the rental housing stock in the United States. The NAHB analysis of 2009 Census data found that one-third of rental housing consisted of the [...]

  7. [...] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. As single-family homes age, they are more likely to transition from the owner-occupied to the [...]

  8. [...] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. As single-family homes age, they are more likely to transition from the owner-occupied to the [...]

  9. [...] However, they also note that, despite the elevated market share, the total number of single-family starts built for rental purposes remains fairly low, at just 21,000 homes started over the past year, while the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock is 27% according to the 2010 American Com….  [...]

  10. [...] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they are more likely to transition from [...]

  11. [...] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they are more likely to transition from [...]

  12. [...] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they are more likely to transition from [...]

  13. […] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they are more likely to transition from […]

  14. […] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they are more likely to transition from […]

  15. […] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they often transition to the rental […]

  16. […] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they often transition to the rental […]

  17. […] course, the built-for-rent share of single-family homes is considerably smaller than the single-family home portion of the rental housing stock, which is 27% according to the 2010 Ameri…. The reason for this is that as single-family homes age, they often transition to the rental […]

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